Member Coronavirus Information

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What you need to know about COVID-19

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a disease that causes respiratory illness in people and can spread from person to person. People of all ages can be infected. Older adults and people with pre-existing medical conditions like asthma, diabetes and heart disease may be more likely to become severely ill if infected.

Coronavirus and Symptoms

COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) is a disease caused by a virus named SARS-CoV-2. It can be very contagious and spreads quickly. COVID-19 most often causes respiratory symptoms that can feel much like a cold, the flu or pneumonia.

COVID-19 may attack more than your lungs and respiratory system. Other parts of your body may also be affected by the disease. Most people with COVID-19 have mild symptoms, but some people become severely ill.

Visit the CDC to learn more.

The symptoms of coronavirus include mild to severe respiratory symptoms. Symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath, and lower respiratory illness. COVID-19 can be contagious before a person begins showing symptoms.

If you have been exposed or begin showing symptoms of the virus or flu, contact your healthcare provider or health department immediately. 

We all have a role to play in protecting our communities and families from the spread of coronavirus. It is similar to other communicable viruses. You can also follow these tips to prevent infection:

  • Wash your hands thoroughly and frequently. Use soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizing rub (must contain at least 60 percent alcohol).
  • Wear a face covering/mask when in public and/or around others who do not live in your home if you are not fully vaccinated.
  • Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze by coughing/sneezing into your elbow.
  • Promptly dispose of tissues in a wastebasket after use.
  • Clean public surfaces thoroughly.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Avoid shaking hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Get a flu vaccine annually.

 

Your Healthcare Coverage

Yes. When medically necessary diagnostic testing, medical screening services and/or treatment is ordered by your health care provider, we will cover the cost of medically necessary COVID-19 tests, screenings, associated physician’s visit(s) and/or treatment.

No. We will not require prior authorization, prior certification, prior notification and/or step therapy protocols for medically necessary COVID-19 diagnostic testing, medical screening services, and/or treatment when medically necessary services are ordered and/or referred by a licensed health care provider.

Medically necessary COVID-19 diagnostic testing, medical screening services and/or treatment and the associated physician’s visit will be covered when ordered, referred and/or performed in the following In-Network locations:

  • Physician’s/Practitioner’s Office
  • Independent Laboratory/Diagnostic Facility   
  • Urgent Care Facility
  • Emergency Department Facility

Are you unsure if you have been exposed to or at-risk of being infected with COVID-19? Schedule a virtual care visit with a provider. It is a good option for non-urgent care to limit potential exposure in a physician’s office or other healthcare facility. 

No. We will cover medically necessary COVID-19 diagnostic testing, medical screening services and/or treatment at no charge to you, when such services are ordered by your health care provider.

Any medically necessary treatment related to COVID-19 would be considered a covered benefit. We are committed to ensuring access to COVID-19 treatment services in accordance with federal and state law.

COVID-19 Vaccine

  • COVID-19 vaccines help our bodies develop immunity to the virus that causes COVID-19 without us having to get the illness.
  • Different COVID-19 vaccines may work in our bodies differently but all provide protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • None of the COVID-19 vaccines can give you COVID-19.
  • Bringing new vaccines to the public involves various steps, all which must be followed to ensure they are safe and effective before they are made available for use.

Call your doctor with any questions. Ask when you can make an appointment with them. Or find out where to get your vaccine at cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines or vaccinefinder.org.

While it is not a requirement, getting your COVID-19 vaccine will give you the best chance of protecting yourself and your loved ones from getting COVID-19 in the future.

You should get an updated COVID-19 vaccine even if you already had COVID-19.

  • Getting a COVID-19 vaccine after you recover from COVID-19 infection provides added protection against the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • People who already had COVID-19 and do not get vaccinated after their recovery are more likely to get COVID-19 again than those who get vaccinated after their recovery.

CDC recommends COVID-19 vaccines for everyone 6 months and older and boosters for everyone 5 years and older, if eligible.

The CDC currently recommends the COVID-19 vaccine for pregnant women. If you have questions about getting the vaccine, it is recommended to discuss with your doctor to make an informed decision.

To maximize protection from COVID-19 and prevent possibly spreading it to others, wear a mask indoors in public if you are in an area of substantial of high transmission.

Wearing a mask is most important if you have a weakened immune system or if, because of your age or an underlying medical condition, you are at increased risk for severe disease, or if someone in your household has a weakened immune system, is at increased risk for severe disease, or is unvaccinated. If this applies to you or your household, you might choose to wear a mask regardless of the level of transmission in your area.

Fully vaccinated people who have come into close contact with someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 should be tested 3-5 days after exposure. They should wear a mask in public indoor settings for 14 days or until they receive a negative test result.

Visit the CDC's COVID-19 Prevention page for more information.

  • A small percentage of people who are fully vaccinated will still get COVID-19 if they are exposed to the virus that causes it. These are called “vaccine breakthrough cases.” This means that while people who have been vaccinated are much less likely to get sick, it will still happen in some cases. It’s also possible that some fully vaccinated people might have infections, but not have symptoms (asymptomatic infections). Experts continue to study how common these cases are.
  • If you get COVID-19 after vaccination, your symptoms might be less severe.
  • Fully vaccinated people are much less likely to be hospitalized or die than people with similar risk factors who are not vaccinated.

According to the CDC:

  • Hundreds of millions of people in the United States have safely received COVID-19 vaccinations.
  • COVID-19 vaccines used in the response to the pandemic underwent the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history.

Some people have side effects after COVID-19 vaccination, while others might have no side effects. Side effects tend to be mild, such as soreness at the injection site and fever, and should go away within a few days. Learn more about common side effects after COVID-19 vaccination.

No. The COVID-19 vaccine will be at no cost to you. You do not need to get a prior authorization for your vaccine.

Yes. Transportation to medical appointments is a covered benefit for Sunflower Medicaid members. Call us at 877-644-4623 for help scheduling a ride. You may also be able to receive transportation by contacting United Way-211 to access local community resources for transportation, which may include the Lyft Vaccine Alliance Program.